Things to Do in Detroit!

Things to Do in Detroit!

As a bustling international city, Detroit has limitless things to do, especially with the greater state of Michigan as a magnificent backdrop.  Michigan is bordered by four Great lakes and is home to 11,000 lakes within the state, providing abundant opportunities for the adventurous at heart.  The city of Detroit also sits on the Detroit River, with Windsor, Canada on the other side, only a quarter mile away.  Bring your passport if you want to visit! For a recent piece of history, walk through the Woodlawn Cemetery to see Aretha Franklin’s grave. For some older history, check out the Motown museum, home to Studio A, a famous recording studio, and the flat where Berry Gordy lived. Brewery and riverboat tours as well as getting outdoors in Belle Isle State Park are popular attractions for people new to the area too.  The Charles H. Write Museum of African American History and Ford Rouge Factory, where the F-150 was built, are also options.  Special visits on the Annual Meeting program include General Motor’s Detroit-Hamtramck Plant Tour; the Detroit Institute of Art, which houses the Diego Rivera murals; and a Henry Ford Museum Tour, taking us back in time to what the city looked like in the early 20th century.

Detroit Restaurants

Detroit Restaurants

Detroit has everything from glamorous black tie restaurants to hole-in-the-wall bars and swanky jazz club eats. The range spans “Detroit Vegan Soul Food” to the “best sandwich in America” (found at Slows Bar BQ).  And better yet, it’s known for its local ingredients due to being one of the most agriculturally diverse areas in the U.S. Some Michigan must-have eats include Mackinac Island fudge, fresh caught whitefish, artisan cheeses, and “Detroit-style pizza” at famous Buddy’s Pizza.  Coney dogs are an additional Detroit staple, a variation on the classic American hot dog.  The famous coney dog dispute over who invented the first coney dog, either the restaurant Lafayette Coney Island or its rival American Coney Island, is right across the street from the convention center.  Eastern Market is also very close by, a walkable attraction for a number of food hotspots.

Detroit’s Renaissance

Detroit’s Renaissance

In the early 1900s, Detroit was a booming industrial town, put on the map by hosting Henry Ford’s first car factory. GM and Chrysler soon found a home in Detroit as well, which spurred population growth and innovation in the region. Detroit has experienced an incredible revitalization since the 20th century though, and is no longer recognizable as merely an industrial town.  Over $24 billion has been invested in renovation projects since 2006.  Midtown Detroit is now named one of the 25 hottest neighborhoods in America. The city is home to four major sports teams; an emerging walkable 50-block hub called District Detroit, chock full of restaurants, bars, businesses, and parks; and a thriving riverfront scene.  The city has a widespread bike share system as well as a new streetcar, called the QLine.  This summer, DTE Energy built Beacon Park in the middle of the city, which houses food trucks, a restaurant, walking paths, and ample space for sports and music.  Detroit is now known as a romantic getaway full of history, activity, and life. We are excited to explore what the city has to offer at our Annual Meeting!

Zero-Energy Capable Mini-City in Austin, Texas Keeps Costs Low

Zero-Energy Capable Mini-City in Austin, Texas Keeps Costs Low

A mini-city 20 minutes from downtown Austin, Texas is taking energy efficiency to new heights—and new low costs.

A new zero-energy-capable community, Whisper Valley just won Green Home Builder's 2017 Community of the Year for its fine amenities, ample natural spaces, access to retail, and the powerful smart infrastructure and advanced energy technologies that power its homes and businesses.

All of the 7,500 homes built in Whisper Valley are almost identical. They feature 5 kW solar on the roofs, Google Fiber internet, and unique temperature regulation with smart thermostats. Each home is connected to a central geothermal pumping system, moving hot air from the ground into homes in the winter and sucking heat out of the house and back in the ground in the summer. Excess heat provides for the hot water systems as well. Due to these technologies, home owners have the potential to obtain net-zero energy output, producing as much energy with their home as they consume. Read more...

What's Happening in the State Energy Landscape?

What

Join us this September 23-26 in Detroit to discover the latest energy trends, policies, and issues affecting states. The 2018 NASEO Annual Meeting will feature interactive sessions examining diverse energy markets and high-impact policies that build resiliency, state economies, and local communities. In particular, we will showcase successful energy programs, policies, and projects to foster peer learning and exchange among the states in areas like transportation, electrification, building-grid integration, and financing for energy innovation and infrastructure modernization. Some special session highlights this year include energy cybersecurity, energy strategies focusing on rural communities, the costs and benefits of strategic electrification systems, and how the City of Detroit is accelerating sustainability. We hope to see you in Detroit! Register Today!